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The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) is a National Indigenous Organization representing the political voice of Indigenous women, girls and gender diverse people in Canada, inclusive of First Nations on and off reserve, status and non-status, disenfranchised, Métis and Inuit. An aggregate of Indigenous women’s organizations from across the country, NWAC was founded on the collective goal to enhance, promote and foster the social, economic, cultural and political well-being of Indigenous women within their respective communities and Canada societies. 

Since 1974, NWAC has established strong and lasting governance structures, decision-making processes, financials policies and procedures, and networks to help achieve its overall mission and goals. Today, NWAC engages in national and international advocacy aimed at legislative and policy reforms that promote equality for Indigenous women, girls, Two-Spirit and gender diverse people, including LGBTQ+ people. Through advocacy, policy and legislative analysis, NWAC works to preserve Indigenous culture and advance the well-being of all Indigenous women, girls and gender diverse people, as well as their families and communities.  

NWAC works on a variety of issues such as employment, labour and business, health, violence prevention and safety, justice and human rights, environment, early learning childcare and international affairs.  

Much like a “Grandmother’s Lodge,” we as aunties, mothers, sisters, brothers and relatives collectively recognize, respect, promote, defend and enhance our Indigenous ancestral laws, spiritual beliefs, language and traditions given to us by the Creator. 

Make a donation

Contact Your MP

An Indigenous Women’s Support Centre

Minwaashin Lodge provides a range of programs and services to First Nations, Inuit and Métis women and children (regardless of status) who are survivors of domestic and other forms of violence, and who may also be suffering the effects of the residential school system. All programs and services are provided in the context of cultural beliefs and values to ensure a holistic approach is used as part of the healing journey. 

 

We envision a world where all of creation, the earth, the air, the waters, animals and people are safe, honoured and respected; where children and elders are valued; where culture and diversity are celebrated.

The mission of Minwaashin Lodge is to provide prevention and intervention services and programs for grandmothers, women, children and youth who are survivors of family violence and the residential school system, including those impacted by intergenerational effects. A full range of violence prevention and intervention programs and services is provided in the context of reclaiming the wisdom of First Nations, Métis and Inuit cultural teachings. 

Make a donation

Contact Your MP

The Legacy of Hope Foundation (LHF) is a national, Indigenous-led, charitable organization that has been
working to promote healing and Reconciliation in Canada for more than 20 years. The LHF’s goal is to
educate and raise awareness about the history and existing intergenerational impacts of the Residential
and Day School System (R &D SS) and subsequent Sixties Scoop (SS) on Indigenous (First Nations,
Inuit, and Métis) Survivors, their descendants, and their communities to promote healing. The LHF works
to encourage people to address discrimination and injustices in order to contribute to the equality, dignity,
and respectful treatment of Indigenous Peoples and to foster Reconciliation.
Part of the LHF’s goals are to provide needed resources for schools. The history and information about
residual trauma and the links to current social and economic issues are rarely taught in schools, which can
lead to misinformation and foster racism, all of which underlines the need for more public education and
resources on the topics of the R &D SS, SS, and other colonial acts of oppression. In schools today, there is
little mentioned about the amazing contributions Indigenous Nations have made and continue to make to the fabric of our society.

A comprehensive history highlighting the diversity of our Nations and our cultures,
languages, and traditions is lacking in the current curriculum. The LHF has created many resources to
address this critical gap and help inject more perspectives and knowledges on these issues to foster healthy
and informed dialogue and inspire positive actions to address the situation facing Indigenous Peoples.
The LHF honours Survivors and their families by taking direction from them to ensure that our initiatives
consider their true and authentic voices, while providing Survivors with emotional support to ensure their
work with us is an empowering and healing experience. We believe that by educating Canadians about
both the rich histories of Indigenous Peoples, and the subsequent pain and injustices inflicted on
generations after contact, we can highlight the strength and resilience of Survivors. With this approach, we
can build respect, understanding, and empathy, so that meaningful connections can happen and we can
inspire action that works toward addressing racism, establishing equality, hope, and healing in Canada.
The LHF works to encourage people to address discrimination and injustices in order to contribute to the
equality, dignity, and respectful treatment of all. We will continue to work with teachers, school boards,
universities, policing agencies, governments, officials, banks, unions, private businesses, and citizens to
help meet these goals. The LHF offers a unique and comprehensive collection of resources, exhibitions,
workshops, and research reports to anyone wanting to learn about Indigenous Peoples and willing to work
toward Reconciliation. We believe true Reconciliation requires consistent, positive, and informed effort
and action by everyone. Our teaching tools include the following:

1. Curriculum Resources that:
Emphasize Indigenous voices and explore First Nations, Inuit, and Métis experiences;
Provide comprehensive lesson plans, activity guides, and other resources; and
Feature two new curricula: one for K-6 and a new Sixties Scoop curriculum for 7-12.
2. Exhibitions that are:
Stand-alone, mobile exhibitions that provide a unique, museum-like experience and include first-hand, Indigenous
Testimonies of the RSS and SS and the links to ongoing issues such as the high rates of missing and murdered
Indigenous women and girls and LGBTQ2S+. The exhibitions, which promote healing and encourage acts of
Reconciliation, can be hosted in schools, offices, parliaments, galleries, or in any public space.
3. Workshops and Training:
The LHF offers Workshops and training that fosters Reconciliation initiatives in your community, department, or
organization by teaching about intergenerational impacts of the RSS and the SS and the links to ongoing issues such as
the high rates of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls and LGBTQ2S+. We teach people how to be an
ally and the steps needed to address racism and work for change.
4. Research Reports:
The LHF has research reports available on the impacts of Residential Schools in the areas of justice, domestic violence,
suicide, inequality, health, and history of Indigenous Peoples; and research reports on best practices for supporting
Indigenous well-being, culture, and economic prosperity are also available from the LHF for free, and some at a
minimal cost to support learning within your organization.
For more information, go to: www.legacyofhope.ca
Please check out our video at: www.vimeo.com/352694516
For training or to request exhibitions, please call the LHF at: 613-237-4806, fax 613-237-4442
Or email us at: info@legacyofhope.ca

Make a donation

Contact Your MP

Our Center was incorporated in 2014 following the “Aboriginal Justice in the Greater Montreal Area” report by the Justice Table of the Montreal Urban Aboriginal Community Strategy Network (March 2013). The report highlighted the lack of continuum of services for Indigenous peoples in Montreal in conflict with the law. It also highlighted the absence of alternatives and of a community approach to justice based on Indigenous principles and cultures. Making our home in the Native Friendship Center of Montreal, we opened our doors in the spring of 2017 for service provision.

Vision: Informed, empowered Indigenous persons in the Montreal area who have successfully negotiated their way through an Indigenized justice system and transitioned to a healthy, autonomous life path.

 

THE FIRST PEOPLES JUSTICE CENTER OF MONTREAL’S MISSION IS TO WORK IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE INDIGENOUS COMMUNITY AND THE JUSTICE SYSTEM IN MONTREAL TO:

Support, inform and empower Indigenous persons in addressing their justice issues and in continuing their transition to a healthy and balanced quality of life.

Indigenize the justice systems, including educating key players, to engage with Indigenous persons in a fair, culturally respectful and restorative way.

Make a donation

Contact Your MP

The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) is a National Indigenous Organization representing the political voice of Indigenous women, girls and gender diverse people in Canada, inclusive of First Nations on and off reserve, status and non-status, disenfranchised, Métis and Inuit. An aggregate of Indigenous women’s organizations from across the country, NWAC was founded on the collective goal to enhance, promote and foster the social, economic, cultural and political well-being of Indigenous women within their respective communities and Canada societies. 

Since 1974, NWAC has established strong and lasting governance structures, decision-making processes, financials policies and procedures, and networks to help achieve its overall mission and goals. Today, NWAC engages in national and international advocacy aimed at legislative and policy reforms that promote equality for Indigenous women, girls, Two-Spirit and gender diverse people, including LGBTQ+ people. Through advocacy, policy and legislative analysis, NWAC works to preserve Indigenous culture and advance the well-being of all Indigenous women, girls and gender diverse people, as well as their families and communities.  

NWAC works on a variety of issues such as employment, labour and business, health, violence prevention and safety, justice and human rights, environment, early learning childcare and international affairs.  

Much like a “Grandmother’s Lodge,” we as aunties, mothers, sisters, brothers and relatives collectively recognize, respect, promote, defend and enhance our Indigenous ancestral laws, spiritual beliefs, language and traditions given to us by the Creator. 

Make a donation

Contact Your MP

An Indigenous Women’s Support Centre

Minwaashin Lodge provides a range of programs and services to First Nations, Inuit and Métis women and children (regardless of status) who are survivors of domestic and other forms of violence, and who may also be suffering the effects of the residential school system. All programs and services are provided in the context of cultural beliefs and values to ensure a holistic approach is used as part of the healing journey. 

 

We envision a world where all of creation, the earth, the air, the waters, animals and people are safe, honoured and respected; where children and elders are valued; where culture and diversity are celebrated.

The mission of Minwaashin Lodge is to provide prevention and intervention services and programs for grandmothers, women, children and youth who are survivors of family violence and the residential school system, including those impacted by intergenerational effects. A full range of violence prevention and intervention programs and services is provided in the context of reclaiming the wisdom of First Nations, Métis and Inuit cultural teachings. 

Make a donation

Contact Your MP

The Legacy of Hope Foundation (LHF) is a national, Indigenous-led, charitable organization that has been
working to promote healing and Reconciliation in Canada for more than 20 years. The LHF’s goal is to
educate and raise awareness about the history and existing intergenerational impacts of the Residential
and Day School System (R &D SS) and subsequent Sixties Scoop (SS) on Indigenous (First Nations,
Inuit, and Métis) Survivors, their descendants, and their communities to promote healing. The LHF works
to encourage people to address discrimination and injustices in order to contribute to the equality, dignity,
and respectful treatment of Indigenous Peoples and to foster Reconciliation.
Part of the LHF’s goals are to provide needed resources for schools. The history and information about
residual trauma and the links to current social and economic issues are rarely taught in schools, which can
lead to misinformation and foster racism, all of which underlines the need for more public education and
resources on the topics of the R &D SS, SS, and other colonial acts of oppression. In schools today, there is
little mentioned about the amazing contributions Indigenous Nations have made and continue to make to the fabric of our society.

A comprehensive history highlighting the diversity of our Nations and our cultures,
languages, and traditions is lacking in the current curriculum. The LHF has created many resources to
address this critical gap and help inject more perspectives and knowledges on these issues to foster healthy
and informed dialogue and inspire positive actions to address the situation facing Indigenous Peoples.
The LHF honours Survivors and their families by taking direction from them to ensure that our initiatives
consider their true and authentic voices, while providing Survivors with emotional support to ensure their
work with us is an empowering and healing experience. We believe that by educating Canadians about
both the rich histories of Indigenous Peoples, and the subsequent pain and injustices inflicted on
generations after contact, we can highlight the strength and resilience of Survivors. With this approach, we
can build respect, understanding, and empathy, so that meaningful connections can happen and we can
inspire action that works toward addressing racism, establishing equality, hope, and healing in Canada.
The LHF works to encourage people to address discrimination and injustices in order to contribute to the
equality, dignity, and respectful treatment of all. We will continue to work with teachers, school boards,
universities, policing agencies, governments, officials, banks, unions, private businesses, and citizens to
help meet these goals. The LHF offers a unique and comprehensive collection of resources, exhibitions,
workshops, and research reports to anyone wanting to learn about Indigenous Peoples and willing to work
toward Reconciliation. We believe true Reconciliation requires consistent, positive, and informed effort
and action by everyone. Our teaching tools include the following:

1. Curriculum Resources that:
Emphasize Indigenous voices and explore First Nations, Inuit, and Métis experiences;
Provide comprehensive lesson plans, activity guides, and other resources; and
Feature two new curricula: one for K-6 and a new Sixties Scoop curriculum for 7-12.
2. Exhibitions that are:
Stand-alone, mobile exhibitions that provide a unique, museum-like experience and include first-hand, Indigenous
Testimonies of the RSS and SS and the links to ongoing issues such as the high rates of missing and murdered
Indigenous women and girls and LGBTQ2S+. The exhibitions, which promote healing and encourage acts of
Reconciliation, can be hosted in schools, offices, parliaments, galleries, or in any public space.
3. Workshops and Training:
The LHF offers Workshops and training that fosters Reconciliation initiatives in your community, department, or
organization by teaching about intergenerational impacts of the RSS and the SS and the links to ongoing issues such as
the high rates of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls and LGBTQ2S+. We teach people how to be an
ally and the steps needed to address racism and work for change.
4. Research Reports:
The LHF has research reports available on the impacts of Residential Schools in the areas of justice, domestic violence,
suicide, inequality, health, and history of Indigenous Peoples; and research reports on best practices for supporting
Indigenous well-being, culture, and economic prosperity are also available from the LHF for free, and some at a
minimal cost to support learning within your organization.
For more information, go to: www.legacyofhope.ca
Please check out our video at: www.vimeo.com/352694516
For training or to request exhibitions, please call the LHF at: 613-237-4806, fax 613-237-4442
Or email us at: info@legacyofhope.ca

Make a donation

Contact Your MP

Our Center was incorporated in 2014 following the “Aboriginal Justice in the Greater Montreal Area” report by the Justice Table of the Montreal Urban Aboriginal Community Strategy Network (March 2013). The report highlighted the lack of continuum of services for Indigenous peoples in Montreal in conflict with the law. It also highlighted the absence of alternatives and of a community approach to justice based on Indigenous principles and cultures. Making our home in the Native Friendship Center of Montreal, we opened our doors in the spring of 2017 for service provision.

Vision: Informed, empowered Indigenous persons in the Montreal area who have successfully negotiated their way through an Indigenized justice system and transitioned to a healthy, autonomous life path.

 

THE FIRST PEOPLES JUSTICE CENTER OF MONTREAL’S MISSION IS TO WORK IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE INDIGENOUS COMMUNITY AND THE JUSTICE SYSTEM IN MONTREAL TO:

Support, inform and empower Indigenous persons in addressing their justice issues and in continuing their transition to a healthy and balanced quality of life.

Indigenize the justice systems, including educating key players, to engage with Indigenous persons in a fair, culturally respectful and restorative way.

Make a donation

Contact Your MP